Doug Weight Refuses to Go Quietly Into the Sunset

Yes, it’s time once again for your weekly Islanders related post. So sit down, relax, and don’t get too bored.

For everyone out there who thought that Doug Weight was another washed up has been, after signing on Long Island as a UFA this summer… Well, you’re wrong. At least for now. He’s got six points through seven games and last night proved that he’s going to give his all by destroying poor Brandon Sutter.

While I know we’ve been trying to maintain a YouTube diet here at BMR, I think this video is worthy of a post. Maybe we’re not supposed to do the whole YouTube thing, but I give into temptation way too easily.

On Saturday night while 14 other games were going on, the Islanders took on the Hurricanes in New York. The Islanders lost 4-3, but not after letting 60 shots loose on Canes netminder Cam Ward. Yes. SIXTY. I had to do a double take, too. In the midst of Rick DiPietro getting hurt again, and an announced attendance of 11,219 — horrible for a Saturday night, even by Islander standards — Weight delivered a hit that sent Carolina’s Brandon Sutter into another century. Right now, I imagine Sutter is trying to figure out why it feels like he’s in a small western town circa 1847 and why no one seems to understand what hockey is. But for a 19-year old that partially grew up on Long Island, you have to feel for the kid.

And for the people who complain about how a fight seems to start after every big hit, this is Example 1A as to why that is. It’s really a disservice to your team to not show emotion after your 19-year old teammate gets lit up.

And finally Canes GM Jim Rutherford makes a great point about how the NHL handles hits like these:

“The league should at least stop saying it’s concerned with hits to the head, because it’s not,” Rutherford told TSN.ca. “I’ve had four players – Erik Cole, Trevor Letowski, Matt Cullen and now Brandon Sutter – get badly injured on hits to the head and only one of the guys who hit them was suspended. So don’t tell me the league is concerned about hits to the head because it’s not.

“I realize there are only two ways you can go on this. Either you have a penalty for head-checking, like they do in the Ontario Hockey League, or you don’t and we don’t in the NHL and I understand that and that’s fine, I guess, but don’t tell anyone you care about protecting the players’ heads because it’s not happening.”

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